[AI] Fw: NYt

Rohiet A. Patil patil_rohit at dataone.in
Sat Jan 1 11:18:37 EST 2011


Dear all,
This message was not make to the list yesterday.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rohiet A. Patil" <patil_rohit at dataone.in>
To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
Sent: Friday, December 31, 2010 10:52 PM
Subject: Re: [AI] NYt


> Some one in this discussion rais a point regarding sighted children. On 
> this point, I would like to ask to those people who are aggressively saing 
> that brail is out dated thing because of technology, would you say that 
> sighted children do not need to learn read and write using paper and pen? 
> learning computer is enough for them? If there is no alternetive for 
> sighted also, then we also have no option for brail.
> Sorry because of my poor language, I am unable to express what actually I 
> want to say. But I hope you got my point.
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Amiyo Biswas" <amiyo.biswas at gmail.com>
> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2010 5:52 AM
> Subject: Re: [AI] NYt
>
>
>> Exactly. We are all using computer a lot. This is modern technology. But 
>> Braille is not equal to computer. It is an alternative for pencil and 
>> paper. Just imagine the time when there was no computer, not the old 
>> nnineteenth century, just the days 20 years back. Braille is, I agree, 
>> equivalent to literacy. Moreover, it's cheap and most portable of our 
>> tools.
>>
>> If someone does not know Braille, he is deprived of one skill of 
>> independence. Technology has opened up fresh scope. But it has done so 
>> for sighted people to a much greater extent. I still regret that I can't 
>> afford a Braille display for myself. Listening is not real reading.
>>
>> Best regards,
>> Amiyo Biswas
>> Cell: 91-9433464329
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>> From: "Rohiet A. Patil" <patil_rohit at dataone.in>
>> To: "Sohan" <polite.sonu at gmail.com>; <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
>> Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2010 12:12 AM
>> Subject: Re: [AI] NYt
>>
>>
>>>I would like to say one thing in this regard. Some people says that brail 
>>>is out dated thing because of technological development. But in my 
>>>openian, reading brail is active reading and reading on computer or 
>>>listening the book on CD is a pacive type of reading. We can not enjoy 
>>>the reading in this way. It's my experience.
>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>>> From: "Sohan" <polite.sonu at gmail.com>
>>> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, December 28, 2010 7:55 PM
>>> Subject: Re: [AI] NYt
>>>
>>>
>>>> hello pankaj sir.
>>>>  well said. the persons who use braille for reading and writing will 
>>>> always prefer it because if we want to know the basic factors of 
>>>> education we need braille always. if we want to imagine what is 
>>>> particularly a letter and how words are created and what is the 
>>>> importance of punctuations and most importantly the pleasure of 
>>>> selfreading, we must know braille. so I also think that with the 
>>>> development of technology we deffinitely go with it but braille is an 
>>>> essential tool for the persons who use it. so in this message i again 
>>>> want to wish u on Louis Braille day and a very happy new year.
>>>>    thanks and regards.
>>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>>>> From: "Pankaj Sinha" <sinhapankaj81 at gmail.com>
>>>> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, December 28, 2010 3:48 PM
>>>> Subject: Re: [AI] NYt
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Dear All,
>>>>>
>>>>> This is not the matter of agreement or disagreement. The issue is what
>>>>> makes you more independent, what could be more close to your hart,
>>>>> What carries knowledge perse? In my opinion both braille as well as
>>>>> computer are the mode of education/communication. However, Braille is
>>>>> something which in my opinion is more closer to your hart as you can
>>>>> feel and visualize those letters which you have read through braille
>>>>> like sighted person who has read something. there is only one argument
>>>>> which is put forward while rejecting the use of braille is that
>>>>> braille books are very voluminous, I think this is not the well placed
>>>>> argument. Friends, let me tell you that most of the persons with
>>>>> visual impairment are not from well-to-do families, if they are so,
>>>>> most of them are from the rural background where there is neither 24
>>>>> hours  electricity nor well qualified engineers available in case of
>>>>> some defect in the computer. furthermore, in rural areas you do not
>>>>> have, I will say additional financial resources to meat such
>>>>> requirements. However, if you know braille you can make your short
>>>>> notesany time by using your braille making instruments. At this
>>>>> juncture it should be also be noted that I am ever trying to criticize
>>>>> or underplay the role computer or the use of computer, my only point
>>>>> is that if you know braille and then something else you will always
>>>>> have an advantage and confidence in yourself.
>>>>> Let us take another hypothetical example, being a person with vision
>>>>> impairment, you can not have access to all facilities and services and
>>>>> you want to keep something very confidential . What would you like to
>>>>> prefer? If you want to see time in your watch in a meeting would you
>>>>> like to use mobile phone watch software which makes noise or you would
>>>>> prefer to have a braille watch.
>>>>> ]
>>>>> Always remember braille is your identity and you should always feel
>>>>> proud of knowing the braill.
>>>>>
>>>>> I am really sorry for writing such long mail but I am always hurt when
>>>>> without annaylizing its importance such issues are discussed at
>>>>> length.
>>>>>
>>>>> what is brraille ask from those who have risen to extraordinarily
>>>>> height like justice Yakoob who is the judge of constitutional bench in
>>>>> south Africa and still uses braille while making speeches for hours
>>>>> and hours.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks to God louisse Braille who made me to refute all arguments
>>>>> against the use of braille. You might know the computer but you can
>>>>> never feel more independent or more more confident as you might feel
>>>>> when you know braill.
>>>>>
>>>>> On 12/28/10, Namita Agarwal <namitaagarwal14 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>> hi i agree with Subhash Chandra Vashishth's views.
>>>>>> regards namita
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On 12/28/10, SC Vashishth <subhashvashishth at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>> Hi Kanchan,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks for sharing it. It made a good reading of the experiences of 
>>>>>>> this
>>>>>>> family in USA where carrying a bulky braille book may invite 
>>>>>>> potential
>>>>>>> fear
>>>>>>> of stigma. Also where parents insist that their children with visual
>>>>>>> impairment are not made to do anything which other children don't 
>>>>>>> do-
>>>>>>> including learning braille just to ensure (false) 
>>>>>>> non-discrimination!.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Perhaps the society there has outgrown and mix of such reactions 
>>>>>>> could
>>>>>>> also
>>>>>>> be found in India also in varying degrees. However, to me, option of
>>>>>>> learning braille should  be exercised even if it means doing 
>>>>>>> something
>>>>>>> that
>>>>>>> other children don't do. It is not the question of hiding your 
>>>>>>> vision
>>>>>>> impairment from others but getting prepared to deal with it. This 
>>>>>>> would
>>>>>>> surely not amount to exclusion or special education.  This only 
>>>>>>> means you
>>>>>>> have another tool that you may or may not exercise in future!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Given the advancement in technology, many persons find braille 
>>>>>>> redundant,
>>>>>>> however, it is very useful for little silly things as a braille 
>>>>>>> sticker
>>>>>>> on various similarly sized containers  in the kitchen or on
>>>>>>> medicines pouches etc.  You don't depend on a reader. It may be 
>>>>>>> possible
>>>>>>> that technology may eventually make braille redundant for few 
>>>>>>> individuals
>>>>>>> with means, but surely not for all the blind persons in the 
>>>>>>> developing
>>>>>>> countries.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hence, braille should not be equated with or treated like a special
>>>>>>> education but as a tool that enables a blind person in absence of
>>>>>>> technology
>>>>>>> and provides an equalising environment. Learning new thing requires
>>>>>>> efforts
>>>>>>> which many of us may not want to put or have no interest in it 
>>>>>>> because we
>>>>>>> are happy with the status quo and do not want to go out of our 
>>>>>>> comfort
>>>>>>> zones.
>>>>>>> regards
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>> Warm regards,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Subhash Chandra Vashishth
>>>>>>> Advocate
>>>>>>> Mobile: +91 (11) 9811125521
>>>>>>> Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to. Consider
>>>>>>> environment!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 28 December 2010 12:31, Kanchan Pamnani 
>>>>>>> <kanchanpamnani at gmail.com>
>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> David Paterson Learned Without Braille - NYTimes.com
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The New York Times
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> December 26, 2010
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> For Paterson's Parents, the Choice Was Independence Over Special
>>>>>>>> Education
>>>>>>>> By
>>>>>>>> JEREMY W. PETERS
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> It is a quandary that parents of disabled children grapple with 
>>>>>>>> early and
>>>>>>>> often: What is the right balance between teaching them 
>>>>>>>> self-sufficiency
>>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>>> making
>>>>>>>> sure they have the special accommodations they need?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> As Gov.
>>>>>>>> David A. Paterson
>>>>>>>>  has discovered, the way parents answer these questions has a 
>>>>>>>> tremendous
>>>>>>>> impact on how disabled children fare in the adult world.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Mr. Paterson, in recent interviews, has expressed worry about 
>>>>>>>> leaving the
>>>>>>>> governor's office and learning to live on his own again, after 
>>>>>>>> years of
>>>>>>>> relying
>>>>>>>> on others for a variety of tasks, like guiding him up stairs and 
>>>>>>>> reading
>>>>>>>> his mail.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> He never learned to read
>>>>>>>> Braille,
>>>>>>>> as about 50 percent of blind children did at the time he was 
>>>>>>>> growing up.
>>>>>>>> Instead, he used what little sight he had in his right eye to read 
>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>> high-powered
>>>>>>>> glasses, attending regular classes in a public school.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> That decision was driven by his parents,
>>>>>>>> Basil A. Paterson
>>>>>>>>  and Portia Paterson, who were determined to shield him from any 
>>>>>>>> stigma
>>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>>> insisted that they would not place young David in special education
>>>>>>>> classes.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The teaching of Braille was far more common in the early 1960s, 
>>>>>>>> when Mr.
>>>>>>>> Paterson, now 56, was entering elementary school, according to the
>>>>>>>> National
>>>>>>>> Federation
>>>>>>>> for the Blind. Now, with the development of technologies like 
>>>>>>>> software
>>>>>>>> that
>>>>>>>> reads material aloud at high speeds, only 10 percent of blind 
>>>>>>>> children
>>>>>>>> learn
>>>>>>>> Braille.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "Sometimes the argument is 'I don't want my child to be different, 
>>>>>>>> so I
>>>>>>>> don't want them to learn Braille,' " said Mark A. Riccobono, 
>>>>>>>> executive
>>>>>>>> director
>>>>>>>> of the
>>>>>>>> Jernigan Institute,
>>>>>>>> the research and training division of the national federation. "On 
>>>>>>>> one
>>>>>>>> level there is something to that argument. But in the long term it 
>>>>>>>> means
>>>>>>>> they have
>>>>>>>> fewer tools in their toolbox."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> There are no easy answers, of course, about what path is the right 
>>>>>>>> one
>>>>>>>> for
>>>>>>>> a blind child.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Sheri Wells-Jensen, an associate professor of linguistics at 
>>>>>>>> Bowling
>>>>>>>> Green
>>>>>>>> State University who is blind, said, "I hated it when I got pulled 
>>>>>>>> out of
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>> mainstream classroom to do something the other kids didn't have to 
>>>>>>>> do."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Ms. Wells-Jensen said she eventually came to accept Braille but 
>>>>>>>> fully
>>>>>>>> understood why children and their parents would resist, because of 
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>> common misperception
>>>>>>>> that blind people have extremely limited capabilities.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "If you buy that cultural stereotype, you're not going to want to 
>>>>>>>> be seen
>>>>>>>> hauling a big old Braille book around," Ms. Wells-Jensen said. "You
>>>>>>>> aren't
>>>>>>>> going
>>>>>>>> to want to be pulled out of the classroom to learn Braille."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Parents like Mr. Paterson's often go to great lengths to create as 
>>>>>>>> normal
>>>>>>>> a
>>>>>>>> life as possible for their blind children. The Patersons searched 
>>>>>>>> all
>>>>>>>> around
>>>>>>>> New York City and its suburbs for a school that would not segregate 
>>>>>>>> David
>>>>>>>> into special education.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> When they finally settled on the Hempstead school district on Long
>>>>>>>> Island,
>>>>>>>> their son's school had to order large-type textbooks to accommodate 
>>>>>>>> him.
>>>>>>>> David
>>>>>>>> learned to read by putting on his glasses and pressing his face 
>>>>>>>> close to
>>>>>>>> the page so he could make out the words.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> When he tried to learn cursive writing in the third grade, he would 
>>>>>>>> stand
>>>>>>>> next to the blackboard to see.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> To this day, he uses a pair of high-magnification glasses to read 
>>>>>>>> letters
>>>>>>>> and write personal checks. But he is able to focus on reading and 
>>>>>>>> writing
>>>>>>>> for
>>>>>>>> only a few minutes before the strain overwhelms him. During his 
>>>>>>>> years as
>>>>>>>> governor, aides have read daily briefings, newspaper articles and
>>>>>>>> personal
>>>>>>>> correspondence
>>>>>>>> into a special voice mail system for him to listen to.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Mr. Paterson, who is proud of the way his parents raised him, said 
>>>>>>>> in an
>>>>>>>> interview that his life would be no less difficult had he learned 
>>>>>>>> Braille
>>>>>>>> because
>>>>>>>> Braille has its limitations, too.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "I don't think things would have been easier for me if I had 
>>>>>>>> learned
>>>>>>>> Braille because there's a point that you get to in Braille where 
>>>>>>>> they
>>>>>>>> can't
>>>>>>>> Braille
>>>>>>>> everything for you," he said. "You can't Braille the daily 
>>>>>>>> newspaper."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> While parents want their children to live without the stigma that 
>>>>>>>> special
>>>>>>>> education classes carry, some experts say that this often plays 
>>>>>>>> down the
>>>>>>>> child's
>>>>>>>> limitations.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "Parents see Braille as saying their kid is really blind," said 
>>>>>>>> Diana
>>>>>>>> Brent, who is blind and has studied the developmental differences 
>>>>>>>> between
>>>>>>>> blind children
>>>>>>>> who read Braille and those who do not.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "I've often thought that partially sighted people might have a 
>>>>>>>> harder go
>>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>>> it because they're trying to live in two worlds," Ms. Brent said. 
>>>>>>>> "I live
>>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>>> a sighted world, but I function as a blind person. I'm not trying 
>>>>>>>> to
>>>>>>>> function as if I can see because I never have."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The governor said he was much better at recognizing his limitations 
>>>>>>>> now
>>>>>>>> than when he was younger. "What you learn as you get a little 
>>>>>>>> older," Mr.
>>>>>>>> Paterson
>>>>>>>> said, "is you really aren't exactly like anyone else."
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Mr. Paterson was just 3 months old when he lost most of his vision, 
>>>>>>>> as a
>>>>>>>> result of an infection. He can see nothing out of his left eye and 
>>>>>>>> just
>>>>>>>> shapes,
>>>>>>>> shadows and colors out of his right.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The governor's mother - despite her insistence that he be treated 
>>>>>>>> as a
>>>>>>>> regular boy - also helped him recognize that he needed a balance 
>>>>>>>> between
>>>>>>>> striving
>>>>>>>> for independence and asking for help when he needed it.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> In the book "Sacred Bonds: Black Men and Their Mothers" by Keith 
>>>>>>>> Michael
>>>>>>>> Brown, Mr. Paterson tells a story about a conversation he had with 
>>>>>>>> his
>>>>>>>> mother after
>>>>>>>> he had broken his wrist jumping out of his brother's bedroom window 
>>>>>>>> to
>>>>>>>> win
>>>>>>>> a $5 bet.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> His mother cautioned him that he could not take risks like other 
>>>>>>>> boys,
>>>>>>>> but
>>>>>>>> she also urged him to keep going to mobility classes to learn how 
>>>>>>>> to get
>>>>>>>> around
>>>>>>>> more safely.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> He recalled her saying to him: "You felt you had to pretend to your
>>>>>>>> friends
>>>>>>>> that you don't have a sight problem. I thought that going to this 
>>>>>>>> course
>>>>>>>> would
>>>>>>>> be a message to your friends that you need a little help every once 
>>>>>>>> and a
>>>>>>>> while."
>>>>>>>> To unsubscribe send a message to
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>>>>>>>>
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>>>>>>>>
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>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>>  regards namita
>>>>>>
>>>>>> To unsubscribe send a message to 
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>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> -- 
>>>>> Pankaj Sinha
>>>>> (Advocate), Human Rights Law Network
>>>>> Mobile-09910247816
>>>>>
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>>>>>
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