[AI] HAI THIS IS NAGARAJAN WILLING TO KNOW THE BEST INSTITUTION FOR BLIND PEOPLE

nagarajan madasamy nagarajan.madasamy at gmail.com
Wed Sep 8 02:32:22 EDT 2010


On 6/18/10, accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
<accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in> wrote:
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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Be Sensitive to Blind People, Bombay High Court Tells
>       Govt (Subramani L)
>    2. Re: apologies for wrong intro (Subramani L)
>    3. Re: Unplugged: Goodbye cables, hello energy beams (Subramani L)
>    4. Re: List of Hindi Braille magazines (akhilesh)
>    5. Re: List of Hindi Braille magazines (mahendra)
>    6. Re: Advise (Vamshi G)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 16:37:55 +0530
> From: "Subramani L" <lsubramani at deccanherald.co.in>
> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
> Subject: Re: [AI] Be Sensitive to Blind People, Bombay High Court
> 	Tells Govt
> Message-ID:
> 	<FDA23F70E778F94293C28128B654E11C033B4351 at DHTPMLMAIL.deccanherald.co.in>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
>
> This is really unfortunate. How can the blind and the low vision be the
> sme? There needs to be certain consideration for the totally blind since
> it seems they are left behind. Hope the judgement is in their favour.
>
> Subramani
> -----Original Message-----
> From: accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in
> [mailto:accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in] On Behalf Of shahnaz
> Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 1:56 PM
> To: accessindia at accessindia.org.in
> Subject: [AI] Be Sensitive to Blind People, Bombay High Court Tells Govt
>
>
> Be sensitive to blind people, Bombay high court tells govt
> Hetal Vyas / DNA
> Friday, June 18, 2010 0:56 IST
> Mumbai:
> Maharashtra government's attitude treating persons with total and
> partial blindness
> 'uniformly' while considering them for jobs under the physically
> challenged quota
> has not gone down well with the Bombay high court.
>
> A division bench of acting chief justice JN Patel and justice SC
> Dharmadhikari on
> Thursday observed: "The authorities need to be careful and sensitive
> towards these
> people. These people are not beggars, they can perform if given an
> opportunity."
> The court was hearing a public interest litigation (PIL) filed by
> Harshad Jadhav,
> a blind man seeking directives to the state government to implement
> the provisions
> of Disabilities Act, 1995, and provide jobs to the physically
> challenged people in
> government bodies.
> Chief secretary JP Dange, in an affidavit submitted in the court,
> stated that the
> government is following the recommendations of an expert committee,
> as per the provisions
> of the act. "Therefore, the recommendations are binding and the state
> has no authority
> to overrule them," said the affidavit.
> Dange also justified state's stand on treating the totally blind and
> those with low
> vision uniformly. "If the number of persons from totally blind
> category find it difficult
> to get selected, the state can hardly do anything in this regard,"
> said his affidavit.
> The judges particularly expressed displeasure about this statement,
> observing that
> such an attitude will make the totally blind compete with either with
> the partially
> blind or those with poor vision.
>
> http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report_be-sensitive-to-blind-people-bomba
> y-high-court-tells-govt_1397881
>
>
>
>
>
> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
> disability bill at:
> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 16:43:20 +0530
> From: "Subramani L" <lsubramani at deccanherald.co.in>
> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
> Subject: Re: [AI] apologies for wrong intro
> Message-ID:
> 	<FDA23F70E778F94293C28128B654E11C033B4352 at DHTPMLMAIL.deccanherald.co.in>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
>
> That is true. If someone from your city (presumably a visually
> challenged) travels to another place where you recommend them to meet
> someone who you know through access India, how do you refer to them if
> their gender is not clear?
>
> Subramani
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in
> [mailto:accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in] On Behalf Of aisha
> sahani
> Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 1:33 PM
> To: accessindia at accessindia.org.in
> Subject: Re: [AI] apologies for wrong intro
>
> hello swasti Mathur,
> i think that isn't a problem.
> i know this happens.
>
> here, i have a request to all the new members specially, please state
> in your introduction whether you are a male or female.
>
> this may not have a rational explanation behind, but sometimes it
> helps while approaching someone.
>
>
> so swasti Mathur,
> what about you?
> are you a male or female?
>
> oh, i  am a female, by the way.
>
>
> aisha sahani.
>
>
> On 6/13/10, Swasti Mathur <swastimathur at gmail.com> wrote:
>> hello listers,
>> I again swasti Mathur. I apologize for the blunder i made in giving my
>> introduction. i am doing b.com & not B.a. I am in B.Com 3rd semester.
>> some how it was written B.A. 5th semester in my previous mail.
>> I am extremely sorry for the inconvenience.
>> Swasti Mathur
>>
>>
>> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>> disability bill at:
>> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>>
>> To unsubscribe send a message to
> accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in with
>> the subject unsubscribe.
>>
>> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
> please
>> visit the list home page at
>>
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> n
>>
>
> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
> disability bill at:
> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>
> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
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>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 16:45:10 +0530
> From: "Subramani L" <lsubramani at deccanherald.co.in>
> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
> Subject: Re: [AI] Unplugged: Goodbye cables, hello energy beams
> Message-ID:
> 	<FDA23F70E778F94293C28128B654E11C033B4353 at DHTPMLMAIL.deccanherald.co.in>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
>
> Photovoltaic Cells (which are semiconductors) are already getting
> installed to do this, but they are still too costly for widespread
> deployment. Perhaps it may happen in the next few years.
>
> Subramani
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in
> [mailto:accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in] On Behalf Of aisha
> sahani
> Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 1:26 PM
> To: accessindia at accessindia.org.in
> Subject: Re: [AI] Unplugged: Goodbye cables, hello energy beams
>
> very interesting, but i would be much more interested to discover
> something that can work completely on soller energy.
>
> imagine, how greatly it will reduce the power consumption.
>
> anyways, pretty interesting.
>
> aisha sahani.
>
>
> On 6/17/10, Sanjay <ilovecold at gmail.com> wrote:
>>           Your gadgets are finally about to become truly wireless - as
> long
>>           as you don't mind lasers criss-crossing your living room
>>
>> by David Robson
>>
>> LET'S face it: power cables are unsightly dust-traps. PCs, TVs and
>> music players are becoming slicker every year, but the nest of vipers
>> in the corner of every room remains an ugly impediment to true
>> minimalism.
>>
>> Then there is the inconvenience of charging phones, MP3 players and
>> PDAs. A minor hassle, admittedly, but it is easy to forget to top up
>> the batteries and before you know it you have left the house with a
>> dead gadget. Wouldn't life be simpler if power was invisibly beamed to
>> your devices whenever you walked into a building with an electricity
>> supply? Wireless communication is ubiquitous, after all, so why can't
>> we permanently unshackle our electronics from power cables too?
>>
>> Poor transmission efficiencies and safety concerns have plagued
>> attempts at wireless power transfer, but a handful of start-ups - and
>> some big names, like Sony and Intel - are having another go at making
>> it work. The last few years have seen promising demonstrations of
>> cellphones, laptops and TVs being powered wirelessly. Are we on our
>> way to waving goodbye to wires once and for all?
>>
>> The idea of wireless power transfer is almost as old as electricity
>> generation itself. At the beginning of the 20th century, Nikola Tesla
>> proposed using huge coils to transmit electricity through the
>> troposphere to power homes. He even started building Wardenclyffe
>> Tower on Long Island, New York, an enormous telecommunications tower
>> that would also test his idea for wireless power transmission. The
>> story goes that his backers pulled the funding when they realised
>> there would be no feasible way to ensure people paid for the
>> electricity they were using, and the wired power grid sprang up
>> instead.
>>
>> Wireless transmission emerged again in the 1960s, with a demonstration
>> of a miniature helicopter powered using microwaves beamed from the
>> ground. Some have even suggested that one day we might power
>> spaceships by beaming power to them with lasers (New Scientist, 17
>> February 1996, p 28). As well as this, much theoretical work has gone
>> into exploring the possibility of beaming power down to Earth from
>> satellites that harvest solar energy (New Scientist, 24 November
>> 2007, p 42).
>>
>> Long-distance ground-to-ground wireless power transmission would
>> require expensive infrastructure, however, and with concerns over the
>> safety of transmitting it via high-power microwaves, the idea has been
>> met with trepidation.
>>
>> While we won't be seeing a wireless power grid any time soon, the idea
>> of beaming power on a smaller scale is rapidly gaining momentum. That
>> is largely because, with wireless communication, like Wi-Fi and
>> Bluetooth, and ever-shrinking circuits, power cables are now the only
>> limit to becoming truly portable. "The move was inevitable once
>> wireless communication became popular," says David Graham, a
>> co-founder of Powerbeam in San Jose, California.
>>
>> With this new impetus, engineers and start-up companies have jumped at
>> the challenge, and while beamed power is still in its infancy, three
>> viable options seem to be emerging. The use of radio waves to transmit
>> electricity is perhaps the most obvious solution, since you can in
>> principle use the same kinds of transmitters and receivers used in
>> Wi-Fi communication. Powercast, based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
>> has recently used this technology to transmit microwatts and
>> milliwatts of power over at least 15 metres to industrial sensors.
>> They believe a similar approach could one day be used to recharge
>> small devices like remote controls, alarm clocks and even cellphones.
>>
>> A second possibility, for more power-hungry devices, is to fire a
>> finely focused infrared laser beam at a photovoltaic cell, which
>> converts the beam back to electrical energy. It's an approach
>> PowerBeam has adopted, but so far its efficiency is only between 15
>> and 30 per cent. While that could serve more power-hungry appliances,
>> it would in practice be too wasteful.
>>
>> The technology has been used to power wireless lamps, speakers and
>> electronic photo frames that require less than 10 watts to function.
>> Over time, as both the lasers and photovoltaic cells improve, the
>> company hopes efficiencies of up to 50 per cent will be possible.
>> "There's no reason we couldn't power a laptop eventually," says
>> Graham. Unlike some other possible techniques, a sharply focused beam
>> loses minimal energy over large distances, preserving its efficiency:
>> "A hundred metres is no big deal."
>>
>> Inconvenient beams
>> Others are sceptical that this technique would be practical for truly
>> portable devices, which are constantly moving around and between
>> rooms. "An infrared beam would not be convenient to charge a mobile
>> phone - it's too directional," says Menno Treffers, chairman of
>> the Wireless Power Consortium in the Netherlands. Powerbeam's solution
>> is to fit a small fluorescent bulb to the receiving device so that a
>> camera on the transmitter can track the light and steer the laser beam
>> accordingly. Another problem is that a separate beam is needed for
>> each device you want to power, which would be tricky to engineer, says
>> Aristeidis Karalis at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
>> who is developing an alternative wireless power transmission system.
>>
>> The third possibility for wireless power is magnetic induction - the
>> most attractive option for beefy domestic applications. A fluctuating
>> magnetic field emanating from one coil can induce an electric current
>> in another coil close by, which is how many devices, like electric
>> toothbrushes and even some cellphones, recharge drained batteries. The
>> snag, however, has been that while efficiency is good at close
>> contact, it can drop to zero at even a few millimetres from the
>> transmitter.
>>
>> Enter Karalis and his colleagues. It has long been known that such
>> mechanical energy transfer is improved enormously if two objects
>> resonate at the same frequency - it's how an opera singer can smash a
>> glass if she hits the right pitch. Karalis wondered whether the same
>> idea could improve the efficiency of magnetic induction at greater
>> distances.
>>
>> The team's set-up consisted of an inducting coil connected to a
>> capacitor. The energy within this circuit oscillates rapidly between
>> an electric field in the capacitor and a magnetic field in the coil.
>> The frequency of this oscillation is controlled by the capacitor's
>> ability to store charge and the coil's ability to produce a magnetic
>> field. If the frequency in the energy-transmitter's circuit is
>> different from that of the receiver's circuit, they are non-resonant.
>> The result is that the magnetic field coming from the transmitter
>> interferes destructively with the field building up in the receiver,
>> constraining energy transfer. But if the transmitter and receiver are
>> resonant, the team reasoned, the oscillating fields of their two coils
>> would always be in sync, meaning the interference is constructive and
>> the amount of energy transferred is boosted.
>>
>> They tested their theory in 2007 with great success, transmitting
>> 60 watts across 2 metres, with 40 per cent efficiency (Science,
>> vol 317, p 83). The team has since founded a company called
>> WiTricity to develop the idea. Last year, the firm used two square
>> coils 30 centimetres across, one in the receiver and one in the
>> transmitter, to power a 50-watt TV 0.5 metres from the power supply,
>> with an impressive 70 per cent efficiency. "In some cases, the
>> improvement in the efficiency due to resonance can be more than
>> 100,000 times that of non-resonant induction," says Karalis. Unlike
>> laser-based line-of-sight energy transmission, a magnetic field is not
>> focused and so can pass around or through obstacles between the
>> transmitter and receiver.
>>
>> The big consumer electronics companies have also been keen to
>> investigate "resonant transfer". Sony, for example, has demonstrated a
>> wireless TV, and Intel is investigating the technology for a range of
>> devices. "Power transfer efficiency scales independently of power, so
>> the same efficiency can be achieved for laptops, consumer electronics
>> such as TVs, and smaller portable devices such as cellphones," says
>> Emily Cooper, a research engineer at Intel's labs in Seattle. In other
>> words, the same proportion of the total energy will be lost for a
>> power-hungry plasma TV as for a tiny PDA.
>> Sony has tested a wireless TV, and Intel is investigating the
>> technology for a range of devices
>>
>> With such promising demonstrations, it seems likely that wireless
>> power will one day enter our homes in a big way. A technical standard,
>> dubbed Qi, is already being established for the non-resonant
>> magnetic-induction technique and compatible charging mats will soon be
>> available. It is early days for the other techniques, but similar
>> standards are likely to emerge.
>> With such promising demonstrations it seems likely wireless power will
>> enter our homes in a big way
>>
>> Damage to the person
>> The technology is likely to meet some objections along the way,
>> however. For one thing, you would be forgiven for being a little
>> worried about zapping relatively high-power energy beams through the
>> atmosphere. Take laser transmission, for example. "High powers
>> concentrated in a narrow laser beam could cause serious damage to a
>> person," says Karalis. That shouldn't be a danger with PowerBeam's
>> products: if the small camera on the transmitter fails to see the
>> small light bulb of the receiver, it shuts down the laser within
>> milliseconds. And as a failsafe, the receiver also sends a message to
>> the transmitter via radio if it notices an unexplained interruption in
>> power reception.
>>
>> Exposure to radio waves and fluctuating magnetic fields also have
>> their potential dangers. If they transmit heat to our cells, they can
>> damage tissue over a long period of time. "All the technologies pose a
>> potential risk for thermal interaction with the body, in the same way
>> that radiation from cellphones does," says Rudiger Matthes,
>> vice-chairman of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing
>> Radiation Protection in Oberschleioheim, Germany. But, provided the
>> exposure is below the thresholds put forward in guidelines from
>> ICNIRP, which companies like WiTricity are following closely, it
>> should not be a problem.
>>
>> The fear remains that electromagnetic fields could damage tissue
>> through some other, non-thermal mechanism, a concern raised by many
>> biophysicists about cellphone signals. Without any available cohort
>> studies to test exposure over a long period of time, though, they have
>> had to rely on lab studies, which failed to find any clear or
>> reproducible biological effects. "The matter is still open to debate,"
>> says David de Pomerai at the University of Nottingham in the UK, who
>> studies the effect of microwaves on nematode worms. If the wireless
>> power transmission methods all fall within the ICNIRP's criteria, he
>> says that the exposure should be no more risky than that from
>> cellphones.
>>
>> Perhaps more pressing, though, are environmental concerns. With global
>> warming an ever increasing issue, most people are looking for ways to
>> improve efficiency and save energy - and therefore reduce
>> power-station emissions of greenhouse gases. To some people, wireless
>> power transmission will seem like a distinctly profligate and
>> retrograde step.
>>
>> "The fact that these appliances are only 10 to 60 per cent efficient
>> means that 90 to 40 per cent of the electricity the householder is
>> paying for is wasted," says Paula Owen, who heads the statistics group
>> at the Energy Saving Trust, based in London. "Consider these
>> products next to other typical household appliances. Boilers, for
>> example, are now over 90 per cent efficient. It seems we are going
>> back to the days of incandescent bulbs, which were only 5 per cent
>> efficient at creating light and are now being phased out."
>>
>> Taking individual gadgets, the energy losses might seem small, but
>> scaling up to a truly wireless home would be a much bigger deal. The
>> question is, would you be prepared to throw away your green
>> credentials for wire-free, minimalist beauty?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>> disability bill at:
>> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>>
>> To unsubscribe send a message to
> accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in with
>> the subject unsubscribe.
>>
>> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
> please
>> visit the list home page at
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> n
>>
>
> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
> disability bill at:
> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>
> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
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>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 16:49:26 +0530
> From: akhilesh <akhil.akhil29 at gmail.com>
> To: accessindia at accessindia.org.in
> Subject: Re: [AI] List of Hindi Braille magazines
> Message-ID:
> 	<AANLkTimST5Bi-e2Db1vWtr7g_ZzuOQPem83IrZaWkzvG at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Ok sir, got it.
> thanks a lot for clarifying.
> regards,
> Akhilesh.
>
> On 6/17/10, harish <harish at accessindia.org.in> wrote:
>> Dear Akilesh
>>
>> I appreciate your concern however, pleasetake into consideration the
>> following.
>>
>> 1 We are a very large group presently
>> 2 We have members who are having affiliation to many NGO's
>> 3 By and large with every NGO's there are some disgrunttled members.
>> 4 We don't want AI to be a launching pad to air their differences.
>>
>> We can't be selective and we have to keep an objective and consistent
>> policy
>> across the board.
>>
>> This is the reason we don't wish to discuss 3rd party organisations here.
>> Besides, it is also not ethically appropriate to do so.
>>
>> You can certainly post factual information or published documents
>> pertainly
>> to the case and leave it to fellow members to draw conclusion.
>>
>> It is certainly not acceptable to run a discussion based on hear say.
>>
>> I hope this clarrifies your doubts.
>> Harish Kotian
>> Moderator.
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "akhilesh" <akhil.akhil29 at gmail.com>
>> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
>> Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 4:16 PM
>> Subject: Re: [AI] List of Hindi Braille magazines
>>
>>
>>> Dear Harish sir,
>>> I personally think that this discussion has to be permitted over the
>>> list. I fully agree with you that RTI has to be filed, its ok, but at
>>> least respected members essentially should know that what is going in
>>> the institute. An institute which has to be most responsible for our
>>> visually challenged community.
>>> However, the name of any person should not be pronounced.
>>> Just expressing my personal views.
>>> Apologies in advance if I've anything said wrong.
>>>
>>>
>>> On 6/17/10, Sanjay <ilovecold at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> If I am not wrong, it all happened when a most respected blind person
>>>> was
>>>> the director of NIVH.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>>>> disability bill at:
>>>> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
>>>> with
>>>> the subject unsubscribe.
>>>>
>>>> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
>>>> please
>>>> visit the list home page at
>>>>
>>>> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> ===
>>> Visit my blog at:
>>> freestuff4indians.blogspot.com
>>> Skype ID:
>>> akhil.akhil29
>>> ===
>>>
>>> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>>> disability bill at:
>>> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
>>> with the subject unsubscribe.
>>>
>>> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
>>> please visit the list home page at
>>>
>>> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>> disability bill at:
>> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>>
>> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
>> with
>> the subject unsubscribe.
>>
>> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
>> please
>> visit the list home page at
>>
>> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>>
>
>
> --
> ===
> Visit my blog at:
> freestuff4indians.blogspot.com
> Skype ID:
> akhil.akhil29
> ===
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 14:54:08 +0100
> From: mahendra <galani at chello.at>
> To: accessindia at accessindia.org.in
> Subject: Re: [AI] List of Hindi Braille magazines
> Message-ID:
> 	<20100618125356.DORU4509.viefep11-int.chello.at at edge04.upcmail.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
>
> Dear Harish
> i difur with you on NIVH matter, it is not an NGO but government
> body, and one should discuss, it is publick money, spent by publick
> body after all.
>
>
>
> At 12:19 PM 6/18/2010, you wrote:
>>Ok sir, got it.
>>thanks a lot for clarifying.
>>regards,
>>Akhilesh.
>>
>>On 6/17/10, harish <harish at accessindia.org.in> wrote:
>> > Dear Akilesh
>> >
>> > I appreciate your concern however, pleasetake into consideration the
>> > following.
>> >
>> > 1 We are a very large group presently
>> > 2 We have members who are having affiliation to many NGO's
>> > 3 By and large with every NGO's there are some disgrunttled members.
>> > 4 We don't want AI to be a launching pad to air their differences.
>> >
>> > We can't be selective and we have to keep an objective and
>> consistent policy
>> > across the board.
>> >
>> > This is the reason we don't wish to discuss 3rd party organisations
>> > here.
>> > Besides, it is also not ethically appropriate to do so.
>> >
>> > You can certainly post factual information or published documents
>> > pertainly
>> > to the case and leave it to fellow members to draw conclusion.
>> >
>> > It is certainly not acceptable to run a discussion based on hear say.
>> >
>> > I hope this clarrifies your doubts.
>> > Harish Kotian
>> > Moderator.
>> >
>> > ----- Original Message -----
>> > From: "akhilesh" <akhil.akhil29 at gmail.com>
>> > To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
>> > Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 4:16 PM
>> > Subject: Re: [AI] List of Hindi Braille magazines
>> >
>> >
>> >> Dear Harish sir,
>> >> I personally think that this discussion has to be permitted over the
>> >> list. I fully agree with you that RTI has to be filed, its ok, but at
>> >> least respected members essentially should know that what is going in
>> >> the institute. An institute which has to be most responsible for our
>> >> visually challenged community.
>> >> However, the name of any person should not be pronounced.
>> >> Just expressing my personal views.
>> >> Apologies in advance if I've anything said wrong.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On 6/17/10, Sanjay <ilovecold at gmail.com> wrote:
>> >>> If I am not wrong, it all happened when a most respected blind person
>> >>> was
>> >>> the director of NIVH.
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>> >>> disability bill at:
>> >>> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>> >>>
>> >>> To unsubscribe send a message to
>> >>> accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
>> >>> with
>> >>> the subject unsubscribe.
>> >>>
>> >>> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
>> >>> please
>> >>> visit the list home page at
>> >>>
>> >>> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >> ===
>> >> Visit my blog at:
>> >> freestuff4indians.blogspot.com
>> >> Skype ID:
>> >> akhil.akhil29
>> >> ===
>> >>
>> >> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>> >> disability bill at:
>> >> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>> >>
>> >> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in
>> >> with the subject unsubscribe.
>> >>
>> >> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes,
>> >> please visit the list home page at
>> >>
>> >> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
>> > disability bill at:
>> > http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>> >
>> > To unsubscribe send a message to
>> accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in with
>> > the subject unsubscribe.
>> >
>> > To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other
>> changes, please
>> > visit the list home page at
>> >
>> > http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>> >
>>
>>
>>--
>>===
>>Visit my blog at:
>>freestuff4indians.blogspot.com
>>Skype ID:
>>akhil.akhil29
>>===
>>
>>Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons
>>with disability bill at:
>>http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>>
>>To unsubscribe send a message to
>>accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in with the subject unsubscribe.
>>
>>To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other
>>changes, please visit the list home page at
>>
>> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>
> with warm regards
>         Mahendra Galani
> window's live ID mahendragalani at hotmail.com       skype ID chintu3886
> phone +4314943149 mobile +4369910366055,
> address Herbst strasse 101.16.1 Vienna Austria Europe
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 19:21:27 +0530
> From: "Vamshi G" <gvamshiai at gmail.com>
> To: <accessindia at accessindia.org.in>
> Subject: Re: [AI] Advise
> Message-ID: <4c1b7894.0164730a.5b24.13db at mx.google.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
>
> HI Mr. Gautam,
>
> I don't think you need to ask for anyone's permission for putting such valid
> questions on the list.  Go ahead.
>
> Regards,
> Vamshi G
> M: +91 9949349497
> R: +91 877 2243861
> Skype: gvamshi81
>
> www.retinaindia.org
> >From darkness unto light
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in
> [mailto:accessindia-bounces at accessindia.org.in] On Behalf Of gautam
> Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 3:53 PM
> To: accessindia at accessindia.org.in
> Subject: [AI] Advise
>
>
>
>
>
> All legal experts and strong advocates for the rights of PWD on this list
> such as Subhashchandra Vasist, Rajesh Asudani, Deependar Manocha, Harish
> koshan, and many others,
>
>
>
> As you all may be aware that NFB, Karnataka is in process to persuade the
> state government through all possible means of advocacy and lobbing for
> effective implementation of its legal and moral obligations.  Particularly
> for due implementation of scheme of job reservation in term of PWD act, but
> here I have number of questions and quarries to understand the legal
> provisions related to the   job reservation in public employment in their
> real spirit.   I am therefore looking for your permission to put forward to
> all of you either on or of the list for due clarification.   Positive
> response to this request shall be appreciated.
>
>
>
> Gautam Prakash Agarwal
>
> President,
>
> NFB, Karnataka
>
>
>
> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
> disability bill at:
> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>
> To unsubscribe send a message to accessindia-request at accessindia.org.in with
> the subject unsubscribe.
>
> To change your subscription to digest mode or make any other changes, please
> visit the list home page at
>   http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> AccessIndia mailing list
> AccessIndia at accessindia.org.in
> http://accessindia.org.in/mailman/listinfo/accessindia_accessindia.org.in
>
>
> End of AccessIndia Digest, Vol 50, Issue 103
> ***********************hullo list members
this is nagarajanwilling to know the best institution in kerala
culcutta and hethrabath for blind people
please inform   me
phone : 9003763539




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