[AI] SBI launches special service for visually handicapped

Srinivasu Chakravarthula srinivasu at srinivasu.org
Thu Jul 29 10:54:08 EDT 2010


While I may appreciate the effort, I think, SBI may be interprating
the term accessibility and inclusion. I am not sure how SSBC would
customers who are persons with disabilities. I am sure and it's not
feasable for SBI to establish such centres in more than one area in a
city. Considering that, why would some one go all the way to SSBC to
use ATM. I think, they need to invest and put in efforts to make their
main stream services accessible to all.

On 7/29/10, Surajsingh Jogi <soorajsingh73 at gmail.com> wrote:
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>        From E-Group, Banking-News
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>       SBI launches special service for visually handicapped
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>       The United News of India
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>       Published on July 19, 2010
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>       Mumbai, July 19: (UNI) As part of responsibility to better service
> society, State Bank of India (SBI) will soon start a new service for the
> visually handicapped persons.  It has been given the name Self Service
> Banking Centre (SSBC), and is to be operationalised shortly. To begin with
> the Centre has been set up at the Delhi Head office of SBI at Parliament
> Street. The Centre is handicapped friendly with a ramp for wheelchairs.
>
>
>
>       Facilities for Visually handicapped include the provision of a
> dedicated Braille keypad ATM. SSBC is a staff less technology based banking
> outfit providing multiple banking facilities, namely ATMs, Internet banking
> and mobile banking. 'Roll out of the SSBCs is aimed at increasing customer
> convenience and improving access to financial services,' Senior Bank
> officials said.
>
>
>
>       The Centre was inaugurated recently by SBI Chairman O P Bhatt and will
> become functional soon. India is perhaps unique in having an extensive and
> elaborate programme of financial inclusion. It is incumbent upon state-run
> Banks to provide 40 per cent of their lending to customers from the priority
> sector, which includes agriculture, artisans, small and medium enterprises
> and scheduled castes and tribes. Most government-owned banks also give loans
> to students for pursuing studies, whose dimension is growing rapidly.
>
>
>
>       Another major effort of the Public Sector Banks is to now cover the
> unbanked sectors of the economy, which means areas where banking has not
> reached the populace in urban and rural areas. A large segment of society
> remains under the clutches of money lenders, who charge exorbitant rates of
> interest.
>
>
>
>       State-owned banks are now taking new initiatives to reach out to the
> less privileged groups and those having problems by virtue of a chance of
> birth or that developed later on in life. They need compassion and help. It
> is a well known fact that private sector banks being driven by sheer profit
> motive are reluctant to start such services, even though Banks like the HSBC
> have embarked upon the exercise of financial inclusion.
>
>
>
>       Banking services even in a country like South Africa are highly
> expensive for the common customer. For instance, keeping money below a
> certain level is chargeable, and so is a bank account statement. This is
> true despite a nationwide programme of Black empowerment. All said and done,
> the black population of South Africa remains poor and finds it difficult to
> take advantage of financial services, including banking and insurance.
>
>
>
>       Experts say many countries regard India as a role model for other
> developing countries to emulate with regard to provision of financial
> services--it virtually escaped the global meltdown while the banking sector
> in the West was in the throes of a financial crisis, its elaborate programme
> of financial inclusion and now special facilities for certain sections like
> women and small enterprises. The latest in this league are special services
> for visually handicapped persons by the biggest bank of the country.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>       SBI launches special service for visually handicapped
>
>
>
>       The United News of India
>
>       Published on July 19, 2010
>
>
>
>
>
>       Mumbai, July 19: (UNI) As part of responsibility to better service
> society, State Bank of India (SBI) will soon start a new service for the
> visually handicapped persons.  It has been given the name Self Service
> Banking Centre (SSBC), and is to be operationalised shortly. To begin with
> the Centre has been set up at the Delhi Head office of SBI at Parliament
> Street. The Centre is handicapped friendly with a ramp for wheelchairs.
>
>
>
>       Facilities for Visually handicapped include the provision of a
> dedicated Braille keypad ATM. SSBC is a staff less technology based banking
> outfit providing multiple banking facilities, namely ATMs, Internet banking
> and mobile banking. 'Roll out of the SSBCs is aimed at increasing customer
> convenience and improving access to financial services,' Senior Bank
> officials said.
>
>
>
>       The Centre was inaugurated recently by SBI Chairman O P Bhatt and will
> become functional soon. India is perhaps unique in having an extensive and
> elaborate programme of financial inclusion. It is incumbent upon state-run
> Banks to provide 40 per cent of their lending to customers from the priority
> sector, which includes agriculture, artisans, small and medium enterprises
> and scheduled castes and tribes. Most government-owned banks also give loans
> to students for pursuing studies, whose dimension is growing rapidly.
>
>
>
>       Another major effort of the Public Sector Banks is to now cover the
> unbanked sectors of the economy, which means areas where banking has not
> reached the populace in urban and rural areas. A large segment of society
> remains under the clutches of money lenders, who charge exorbitant rates of
> interest.
>
>
>
>       State-owned banks are now taking new initiatives to reach out to the
> less privileged groups and those having problems by virtue of a chance of
> birth or that developed later on in life. They need compassion and help. It
> is a well known fact that private sector banks being driven by sheer profit
> motive are reluctant to start such services, even though Banks like the HSBC
> have embarked upon the exercise of financial inclusion.
>
>
>
>       Banking services even in a country like South Africa are highly
> expensive for the common customer. For instance, keeping money below a
> certain level is chargeable, and so is a bank account statement. This is
> true despite a nationwide programme of Black empowerment. All said and done,
> the black population of South Africa remains poor and finds it difficult to
> take advantage of financial services, including banking and insurance.
>
>
>
>       Experts say many countries regard India as a role model for other
> developing countries to emulate with regard to provision of financial
> services--it virtually escaped the global meltdown while the banking sector
> in the West was in the throes of a financial crisis, its elaborate programme
> of financial inclusion and now special facilities for certain sections like
> women and small enterprises. The latest in this league are special services
> for visually handicapped persons by the biggest bank of the country.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> S.S.Jogi
> Voice your thoughts in the blog to discuss the Rights of persons with
> disability bill at:
> http://www.accessindia.org.in/harish/blog.htm
>
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-- 
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Best regards,

Srinivasu Chakravarthula
Mobile: +91 990 081 0881
Website: http://www.srinivasu.org
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