[AI] The Care & Feeding Of Li-Ion Batteries

shahnaz shycurrim at yahoo.co.in
Sun Jun 27 04:44:50 EDT 2010


>Here's an article someone posted to another list which I thought might
>be good to read since your players have these batteries in them. The
>article is from 2007, so some aspects may have changed within that
>time. I personally let my player run down to 10% or below and then
>charge it overnight and have had several instances of it draining
>completely with no ill effects.
>
>Laz
>
>The care and feeding of Li-Ion batteries
>
> * Date: November 2nd, 2007
> * Author: William Jones
> * 
> http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/helpdesk/?p 
> 4
>
>Lithium-Ion - or Li-Ion - batteries are in everything, and while they
>may not last forever, they'll benefit from a little tender loving
>care. This time, five strategies that will help your users get the
>most out of the rechargeable batteries in their laptops and portable
>devices.
>
>Device manufacturers categorize batteries as "consumables." They're
>expected to wear out; it's how they do what they do. The warranties
>provided by computer companies usually have different coverage terms
>for a laptop's battery than for the computer's other components. Even
>if you take the best possible care of your battery, its performance
>will degrade over time, and I've found that batteries older than two
>or three years aren't good for much runtime at all.
>
>Accept the fact that your battery won't last forever, no matter what.
>
>Oxidation in the cells can prevent an old battery from discharging
>properly, so even when left on a shelf, a battery's lifespan shortens
>with time. That doesn't mean that there aren't some steps that you can
>take to ensure the Li-Ion batteries in your laptop or cell phone last
>as long as possible.
>
>Batteries are made to be used, so use them.
>
>Just like couch potatoes, batteries need exercise. The chemicals in
>Lithium-Ion batteries respond best to regular recharging. So if you
>have a laptop, don't keep it plugged in all the time; go ahead and let
>it drain to about 40 or 50 percent of capacity, and then recharge your
>computer.
>
>The life of a Lithium-Ion battery can be measured in charge cycles. A
>charge cycle occurs when 100% of a battery's capacity is used. Let's
>say you use 50% of your laptop's battery one day, charge it overnight,
>and then you use 50% of the battery again the next day. Even after
>charging it back up again, you'll have only had one charge cycle
>occur. Most laptop batteries are rated for a useful life of at least
>300-500 charge cycles, but high-quality, properly maintained batteries
>can retain up to 80% of their original life, even after 300 cycles.
>
>Periodically calibrate your battery.
>
>Most batteries that have a "fuel gauge", like those in laptops, should
>be periodically discharged to zero. This can be accomplished simply by
>letting your computer run until it reports a low-battery state and
>suspends itself. (Do not let your computer deep discharge, as I'll
>explain in the next item.)
>
>The gauge that measures the remaining power in your laptop is based on
>circuitry integrated into the battery that approximates the
>effectiveness of the battery's chemical compounds. Over time, a
>discrepancy can develop between the capacity that the internal
>circuitry expects the battery to have and what the battery can
>actually provide. Letting your computer run down to zero every month
>or so can recalibrate the battery's circuitry, and keep your
>computer's estimates of its remaining life accurate.
>
>Don't practice so-called deep discharges.
>
>Most laptops will suspend operation if the battery drains too low.
>Even if your computer goes to sleep, though, most batteries that are
>in good working order will still have a reserve charge available. This
>reserve will hold the computer's working memory in state for a little
>while. A deep discharge has occurred when even that percentage of
>reserve power is used up. The computer will have turned off
>completely, and sometimes you'll notice that it will have lost track
>of the correct date and time. Deep discharges will strain your
>batteries, so try to charge them frequently.
>
>Avoid exposing your battery to heat (when possible).
>
>Heat can overexcite the chemicals in your battery, shortening its
>overall lifespan. In fact, it's been speculated that the biggest cause
>of early battery expiration is the heat that batteries can be exposed
>to when they're stored in computers that are running off AC power.
>Laptops - especially modern multi-core machines - can get very hot
>when they're plugged in, easily over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. That's
>hot enough that extended exposure will negatively affect your battery.
>If you want to be really protective, there's nothing saying that you
>can't pop the battery out of your laptop if you're going to be within
>reach of a power outlet for a while.
>
>There may be times that you can't help but expose your laptop battery
>to heat; you may live in a warm climate, for instance. You can,
>however, try and avoid exacerbating the issue. Make sure your laptop
>is well ventilated and that you're not operating it on a surface that
>retains heat, even when you're not plugged into mains power.
>
>Store your batteries properly.
>
>If your laptop or portable device isn't going to be used for a while,
>you should remove its Lithium-Ion battery, if possible. Even if the
>battery can't be separated from the device, it should be stored in a
>cool environment at about one-half charge. Cool temperature is
>recommended by experts because that can slow the natural discharge
>that batteries will undergo even when they're disconnected from their
>device.
>
>I've seen some people go even further and recommend that spare
>batteries be stored in the refrigerator. I don't think this is a very
>good idea; I'm concerned about condensation that might build up. Don't
>put your batteries on ice, but keep them out of the sun.
>
>Ultimately, I believe that buying spare Li-Ion batteries is a losing
>game, because the batteries start degrading as soon as they're
>manufactured. Usually those spare batteries spend most of their time
>sitting in a charger, losing useful life. If you need to be really
>mobile, you're better off purchasing an adapter cable you can use with
>the power sources available in planes, trains, or autos. And, of
>course, by taking good care of the battery you already have.
>
>The care and feeding of Li-Ion batteries
>
> * Date: November 2nd, 2007
> * Author: William Jones
> * 
> http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/helpdesk/?p 
> 4
>
>Lithium-Ion - or Li-Ion - batteries are in everything, and while they
>may not last forever, they'll benefit from a little tender loving
>care. This time, five strategies that will help your users get the
>most out of the rechargeable batteries in their laptops and portable
>devices.
>
>Device manufacturers categorize batteries as "consumables." They're
>expected to wear out; it's how they do what they do. The warranties
>provided by computer companies usually have different coverage terms
>for a laptop's battery than for the computer's other components. Even
>if you take the best possible care of your battery, its performance
>will degrade over time, and I've found that batteries older than two
>or three years aren't good for much runtime at all.
>
>Accept the fact that your battery won't last forever, no matter what.
>
>Oxidation in the cells can prevent an old battery from discharging
>properly, so even when left on a shelf, a battery's lifespan shortens
>with time. That doesn't mean that there aren't some steps that you can
>take to ensure the Li-Ion batteries in your laptop or cell phone last
>as long as possible.
>
>Batteries are made to be used, so use them.
>
>Just like couch potatoes, batteries need exercise. The chemicals in
>Lithium-Ion batteries respond best to regular recharging. So if you
>have a laptop, don't keep it plugged in all the time; go ahead and let
>it drain to about 40 or 50 percent of capacity, and then recharge your
>computer.
>
>The life of a Lithium-Ion battery can be measured in charge cycles. A
>charge cycle occurs when 100% of a battery's capacity is used. Let's
>say you use 50% of your laptop's battery one day, charge it overnight,
>and then you use 50% of the battery again the next day. Even after
>charging it back up again, you'll have only had one charge cycle
>occur. Most laptop batteries are rated for a useful life of at least
>300-500 charge cycles, but high-quality, properly maintained batteries
>can retain up to 80% of their original life, even after 300 cycles.
>
>Periodically calibrate your battery.
>
>Most batteries that have a "fuel gauge", like those in laptops, should
>be periodically discharged to zero. This can be accomplished simply by
>letting your computer run until it reports a low-battery state and
>suspends itself. (Do not let your computer deep discharge, as I'll
>explain in the next item.)
>
>The gauge that measures the remaining power in your laptop is based on
>circuitry integrated into the battery that approximates the
>effectiveness of the battery's chemical compounds. Over time, a
>discrepancy can develop between the capacity that the internal
>circuitry expects the battery to have and what the battery can
>actually provide. Letting your computer run down to zero every month
>or so can recalibrate the battery's circuitry, and keep your
>computer's estimates of its remaining life accurate.
>
>Don't practice so-called deep discharges.
>
>Most laptops will suspend operation if the battery drains too low.
>Even if your computer goes to sleep, though, most batteries that are
>in good working order will still have a reserve charge available. This
>reserve will hold the computer's working memory in state for a little
>while. A deep discharge has occurred when even that percentage of
>reserve power is used up. The computer will have turned off
>completely, and sometimes you'll notice that it will have lost track
>of the correct date and time. Deep discharges will strain your
>batteries, so try to charge them frequently.
>
>Avoid exposing your battery to heat (when possible).
>
>Heat can overexcite the chemicals in your battery, shortening its
>overall lifespan. In fact, it's been speculated that the biggest cause
>of early battery expiration is the heat that batteries can be exposed
>to when they're stored in computers that are running off AC power.
>Laptops - especially modern multi-core machines - can get very hot
>when they're plugged in, easily over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. That's
>hot enough that extended exposure will negatively affect your battery.
>If you want to be really protective, there's nothing saying that you
>can't pop the battery out of your laptop if you're going to be within
>reach of a power outlet for a while.
>
>There may be times that you can't help but expose your laptop battery
>to heat; you may live in a warm climate, for instance. You can,
>however, try and avoid exacerbating the issue. Make sure your laptop
>is well ventilated and that you're not operating it on a surface that
>retains heat, even when you're not plugged into mains power.
>
>Store your batteries properly.
>
>If your laptop or portable device isn't going to be used for a while,
>you should remove its Lithium-Ion battery, if possible. Even if the
>battery can't be separated from the device, it should be stored in a
>cool environment at about one-half charge. Cool temperature is
>recommended by experts because that can slow the natural discharge
>that batteries will undergo even when they're disconnected from their
>device.
>
>I've seen some people go even further and recommend that spare
>batteries be stored in the refrigerator. I don't think this is a very
>good idea; I'm concerned about condensation that might build up. Don't
>put your batteries on ice, but keep them out of the sun.
>
>Ultimately, I believe that buying spare Li-Ion batteries is a losing
>game, because the batteries start degrading as soon as they're
>manufactured. Usually those spare batteries spend most of their time
>sitting in a charger, losing useful life. If you need to be really
>mobile, you're better off purchasing an adapter cable you can use with
>the power sources available in planes, trains, or autos. And, of
>course, by taking good care of the battery you already have.
>
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