[AI] A useful back button to the future

Shadab Husain shadabhsn at gmail.com
Sat Feb 23 22:24:36 EST 2008


Anand Parthasarathy

'Hooeey' handles personal browsing data across multiple machines

HARNESSING HISTORY: Rajeev Purnaiya's (inset) brainchild "Hooeey" has
users in 80 countries.

BANGALORE: 'History is bunk' said Henry Ford. The man who enabled
millions of Americans to hit their nation's highways, might have been
less dismissive
if he had lived today — in an era when the immediate past history of
one's excursions on the information superhighway becomes a small but
potent tool to
gain that personal and professional edge.

Just think: most of us rarely care to log the web sites we visit. And
when we use public terminals, the more hyper-cautious tend to delete
the entries under
the 'history' button when we quit our work, on the sound principle
that it is nobody's business.

But how often do we say: "What was that nice motoring site I stumbled
on last week?" or "I wish I had noted the address of that free tax
software!"

Now help is at hand. A Bangalore Web start-up has created a useful
tool that allows its registered users (it's free!) to log the history
of their Web browsing
— across multiple machines.

Called Hooeey for no other reason than its cheery sound (
www.hooeey.com)
the tool lets the user switch the 'save history' on or off, at will.

It allows one to gather one's 'web hop' history in one central service
that one can view at any time — and even ask for some basic
statistical analysis
to be done. "Which was my most used site?" "How much time did I spend
on looking at mutual funds last month?"

Granted major search engines like Google, provide similar analytics —
but they are limited to one's use of Google tools — and they are not
one's private
findings.

Hooey is the brainchild of Bangalore-based Rajeev Purnaiya, a graduate
from the University of Alabama and an MS in Industrial Engineering
from Texas A&M
University.

He had earlier founded CyberBazaar, India's first web conference
company before it was sold to WebEx and eventually became a part of
Cisco.

"We tend to spend a lot of time on the Internet. Yet so much of our
activity is wasted," Mr. Purnaiya told The Hindu on Saturday. "I
thought Hooeey would
be one way to harness information about one's own browsing past to
enhance the future browsing experience."

In the few weeks since the service became available, it has acquired
users in 80 countries.

The application allows users to create a "Web Tour" slide show which
they can share with friends on a contact list — useful if you want to
link and share
your uploads on multiple social networking on photo sharing sites.

http://www.hindu.com/2008/02/24/stories/2008022460031300.htm




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